Tag Archives: Gamefreak

Best Pokemon Types for a Single Type Run in Sun and Moon

When Pokémon Sun and Moon was released I wanted to do another Single Type Run (or Monotype Run) analysis on these games similar to my earlier article on previous generations. The purpose of this project was to determine which types were the best for a Single Type Run in Pokémon Sun and Moon? With just two games to tackle, this question is easier to answer than before however, I had to change my setup as Trials and Kahunas were added and Gym Leaders were removed. I had to tackle this problem a little differently but I think I succeeded. If you want to find out what a team of Bug or Psychic Pokémon would be like in Pokémon Sun and Moon just scroll down past these next few paragraphs and find that type.

Image from pokemon.com

RULES: As in my last article, a Single Type Run assumes you don’t trade (so no Golem or Alakazam for instance) to yourself on Pokémon Bank or to other players. If you’re doing a run like Electric, you must capture the first available Electric Pokémon (Pichu) and box your starter. You may capture a Pokémon that will evolve into a certain type (like Pichu for a Psychic-type run) but you must evolve it asap. Only Pokémon that can be caught before the Elite Four are counted (so no Lucario).

So overall, how did Sun and Moon do compared to earlier games? Unfortunately, although Sun/Moon provides players with a diverse set of Pokémon fairly early on, these games are worse at covering weaknesses than XY (but roughly the same as ORAS). XY scored 32 out of 36 (18 types times two games) for neutralizing cover as opposed to SM’s 25 out of 36. Mind you, this is still pretty good when compared to other generation-premiere games as the next best is Ruby/Sapphire with a score of 16 out of 34.

What types did better in these games?

image from bulbagarden.net

image from bulbagarden.net

Right off the bat, the two types that benefited the most were Fairy and Ghost. This is the first time we have starters that evolve into those types. This combined with their neutral coverage makes them great types for a Single Type Run. This is one of the few times a Ghost-type run has neutral coverage so I urge you to try it out here. Also, you can catch a plethora of Ghost Pokémon on the first island including Drifloon, Gastly, Misdreavus, and Sableye; great Pokémon that will go far with you. Fairy types received a nice, mix bag of Pokémon such as Klefki’s weakness neutralization and Primarina and Mimikyu serving as back up.

I would argue that Sun and Moon are probably the best Pokémon games for an Ice-type run. You can get a Crabrawler somewhat early and from there you can get a Delibird and a Shellder and then an Eevee on Aklala Island. The biggest thing to consider is your Sandslash and Ninetales exclusives. Both of which neutralize certain weaknesses (Rock, Steel and Fighting respectively) but other Pokémon can cover them so it’s not a do-or-die situation. The biggest drawback is many of your powerhouses won’t be available until RIGHT before the Elite Four so that’s too bad.

I need to mention Fire type as well but only for Sun. There’s been only one game in the history of Pokémon where Fire’s weaknesses are neutralized and that’s Pokémon Black. Sun has offered a second chance at a fun Fire-type run thanks primarily to the Sun-exclusive Turtonator. It will still be a difficult run but fun nonetheless.

Electric, usually an okay type for a Single Type Run, is blessed with neutral coverage AND an early-available Pokémon via Pichu. Both of these things do not happen often for Electric, much less when they are together. If you’ve been holding out for a good Electric-type game, now’s the chance to try it out with such picks as Magnezone, Vikavolt, Eelektross (scan), and the Alolan variants of Graveler and Raichu.

Finally, we have our usual types that do well for a Single Type Run such as Water, Normal, Steel and so forth.  In particular, Water is probably the best type in Pokemon Sun and Moon for a Single Type Run.  A huge diversity combined with a great starter makes Water Type stand above the rest.  From Gyarados to Aquachnid, from Slowbro to Gastrodon, Sun and Moon gave us a type that can fill many rolls (special defense, physical attacker, status inflictor) and is there with us from the beginning.

What types did worse in these games?

image from bulbagarden.net

As expected, some types took a hit and aren’t as efficient in a Single Type Run as in previous games. For instance, it takes a looooong time before you get a Rock Pokémon so that’s a big disadvantage. Bug’s probably the biggest loser here though as it’s great recent record has finally been broken with glaring weaknesses to Rock attacks. This isn’t to say that a Bug-type run is bad as you still get a lot of new and interesting Pokémon to work with such as Golisopod or Vikavolt, but you’ll have to work hard to make sure you aren’t being torn apart by hikers.

Fighting type also took a hit due to FINALLY losing a starter that gains it as a secondary type. It takes awhile before you catch your first Fighting Pokémon (Crabrawler) and your team will have to watch out for Flying Pokémon (usually, a Lucario would watch your back in previous games but not this time around, they’re available after the Elite Four).

Types

Bug

Ideal Team: Vikavolt, Golisopod/Aquachnid, Romblebee, Parasect, Masquerain, Scolipede (scan)

First Pokémon: Caterpie, Ledyba, and Spinarak via Route 1

Cover weaknesses? No, Rock is not neutralized.

 

Dark

Ideal Team: Incineroar, Sabeleye, Hydregion (scan), Honchkrow, Muk, Pangoro

Optional: Krookodile, Absol, Weavile, Raticate, Sharpedo

First Pokémon: Litten via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Dragon

Ideal Team: Salamence, Komomo-o, Garchomp, Hydreigon (scan), Exeggutor, Drampa (moon)/Turtonator (sun)

Optional: Flygon, Haxorus (scan), Goodra

First Pokémon: Bagon via Route 3

Cover weaknesses? Nope, Dragon is not neutralized in both versions and Fairy is not neutralized in Moon.

 

Electric

Ideal Team: Vikavolt, Graveler, Magnezone, Eelektross(scan), Raichu, Oricorio

Optional: Electivire, Togedemaru, Jolteon, Lanturn

First Pokémon: Pichu via Route 1

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Fairy

Ideal Team: Primarina, Klefki, Whimsicott/Shiinotic, Mimikyu, Wigglytuff, Togekiss (scan)

Optional: Sylveon, Granbul, Ninetales, Carbink, Ribombee, Azumaril (scan)

First Pokémon: Popplio via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Fighting

Ideal Team: Crabominable, Emboar (scan), Poliwrath, Bewear, Kommo-o, Pangoro

Optional: Primeape, Passimian (sun), Hariyama

First Pokémon: Crabrawler via Berry Fields

Cover weaknesses? No, Flying is not neutralized

 

Fire

Ideal Team: Incineroar, Arcanine/Turtonator(sun), Talonflame, Salazzle, Marowak, Emboar (scan)

Optional: Flareon, Chandelure (scan)

First Pokémon: Litten via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Only in Sun thanks to Turtonator. In Moon, Water is not neutralized.

 

Flying

Ideal Team: Toucannon, Gyarados, Drifblim, Aerodactyl, Salamence, Skarmory

Optional: Braviary(sun)/Mandibuzz(moon), Crobat, Talonflame, Masquerain, Honchkrow, Minior, Togekiss (scan)

First Pokémon: Rowlett via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Ghost

Ideal Team: Decidueye, Sableye, Palossand, Aegislash(scan), Marowak, Mimikyu

Optional: Trevanant, Dhelmise, Froslass, Drifblim, Haunter, Chandelure (scan), Mismagius

First Pokémon: Rowlett via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Grass

Ideal Team: Decidueye, Whimsicott, Parasect, Exeggutor, Roserade (scan), Dhelmise

Optional: Victreebel (scan)

First Pokémon: Rowlet via Starter

Cover weaknesses? No, Ice and Flying are not neutralized.

 

Ground

Ideal Team: Dugtrio, Gastrodon, Mamoswine (scan), Palossand, Krookodile, Garchomp

Optional: Mudsdale, Flygon, Rhydon (scan)

First Pokémon: Diglett in Verdant Cavern after completion of first trial

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Ice

Ideal Team: Froslass, Weavile, Sandslash(sun)/Ninetales (moon), Mamoswine (scan), Cloyster/Lapras/Walrein(scan), Crabominable

Optional: Delibird, Glaceon

First Pokémon: Crabrawler via berry patches in Berry Fields on Melemele Island

Cover weaknesses? Surprisingly yes regardless of version differences.

 

Normal

Ideal Team: Toucannon, Tauros/Drampa (Moon), Snorlax, Wigglytuff, Bewear, Oranguru (moon)/Miltank

Optional: Raticate, Blissey

First Pokémon: Yungoos and Pikipek via Route 1

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Poison

Ideal Team: Muk, Scolipede(scan)/Ariados, Crobat, Tentacruel/Toxapex, Salazzle, Roserade (scan)

Optional: Haunter, Victreebel (scan)

First Pokémon: Grimer near the Trainer School

Cover weaknesses? Heck yes.

 

Psychic

Ideal Team: Oranguru, Slowbro/Starmie, Espeon, Metagross, Oricorio, Raichu

Optional: Hypno, Kadabra, Bruxish

First Pokémon: Pichu via Route 1

Cover weaknesses? Nope, Dark is not neutralized.

 

Rock

Ideal Team: Carbink, Rhydon(scan), Graveler, Aerodactyl, Corsola/Relicanth/Caracosta(sun), Bastiodon(moon)/Probopass

Optional: Lycanroc, Sudowoodo, Rampardos (sun), Archeops (moon)

First Pokémon: Roggenrola at Ten Carat Hill

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Steel

Ideal Team: Metagross, Skarmory, Magnezone, Dugtrio, Bastiodon(moon)/Probopass, Aegislash (scan)

Optional Pokémon: Sandslash (sun), Togedemaru, Klefki

First Pokémon: Magnemite near the Trainer School

Cover weaknesses? Yes

 

Water

Ideal Team: Primarina, Gyarados, Slowbro/Starmie/Bruxish, Gastrodon, Cloyster/Lapras/Walrein(scan), Golisopod/Aquachnid,

Optional: Whiscash, Poliwrath, Milotic, Lanturn, Sharpedo, Corsola/Relicanth/Caracosta(sun), Azumaril (scan)

First Pokémon: Popplio via Starter

Cover weaknesses? Yes

Rise of the Poison Type

The latest Pokémon game I played was ORAS and for the first time ever, I seriously trained a Dustox.  Let me just say right now that Dusty is quite a cutie.  I especially love feeding him in Pokémon Amie and bonding with him in general.  My team roster may see powerful members come and go, but Dusty stayed with me until the end.

But Dustox is by no means a strong Pokémon; in fact, this is the first time I decided to train one.  Dustox always struck me as weak, with a poor move distribution and a bad type match up.  What changed?  Why have I now bonded strongly with a Pokémon that before I didn’t take for granted?

Here’s something that many of my Pokémon friends know about me, Poison is my favorite Pokémon Type.  There are so many great and cool Pokémon that I have loved and trained throughout the years.  Just about every game I play in Pokémon has seen at least one Poison Type Pokémon on my team.

My Haunters are usually named Strawberry or Cherry.  Image from http://www.ign.com/wikis/pokemon-red-blue-yellow-version/Haunter

The Poison Type was probably at its peak in Generation 1 when 22% of all Pokémon were Poison Type.  Out of 15 types too!  That’s ridiculous!  You can find them everywhere from the Starter Bulbasaur, to the swarming Zubats in caves, to the swimming Tentacools in the oceans, all the way to the Safari Zone.  You could easily make a team of just Poison Pokémon in Red and Blue.

But the Poison Type has suffered setbacks since Generation 1 that has dropped it to the okay zone.  In Generation 2 it was no longer super effective against Bug (leaving just Grass) and the newly introduced Steel Type was immune to any poisoning.  And from Generation 2 on only a few Poison Type Pokémon have been introduced in each generation dropping the abundance to just 8% of the total Pokémon population (and now, even five generations later, over half of all Poison Pokémon were introduced in Generation 1).

I have had many Crobats, two that stand out to me are Calcite and Leofsig.  Image from http://maestropkmn.blogspot.com/2014/03/estrategia-pokemon-crobat.html

But I remained a steadfast and loyal Poison Type fan.  I just love these guys, they are so much fun and they can be quite versatile as well, especially if they have a second typing.  Gengar, Nidoking, Crobat, Tentacruel, Dragalge, Toxicroak, and of course Bulbasaur are all Pokémon that I loved and trained for more than a decade.  They are like the underdogs in the Pokémon world; they may get the short end of the stick at times but man do I love them.

Poison Type’s position as a sub-par type began to change in Generation V when it, along with many other types, were given new moves and hidden abilities.  Nidoking now had Sheer Force, many of the moths got Quiver Dance, and Toxic’s accuracy rose to 90%.

My Nidoking was called Aragorn. Image from http://pokemondb.net/pokedex/nidoking

But Poison Type finally got to shine in Generation VI.  Poison became a Type to be feared, respected, and used.  Not only did a lot of Poison Type Pokémon got a small boost in their stats, such as Dustox, but an even more important event happened that made Poison viable for both the games and the metagame.

When the Fairy Type was introduced I was beyond excited.  Not only was this a new type, but now the dynamics between type relationships would be shaken.  In the Fairy Type’s introduction video, Gamefreak showed that Fairy would be super effective against the powerful Dragon Type.  Already this was big news but what was not revealed was what was Fairy weak against? Would Poison be good against Fairy?

Thankfully, my prayers were answered and I rejoiced.  Poison was only one of two types super effective against Fairy Type and one of three that resists it.  Now, Poison Type was good against the now prevalent Fairy Type and many Pokémon benefited from that.

But more importantly, Poison cemented itself as a great defensive type.  Immune to poisoning with resistance to Fighting, Bug, Grass, Poison, and now Fairy, the Poison Type is now a good type to use when inflicting statuses on opposing Pokémon.  And with Toxic now 100% accuracy for Poison Types, they are able to excel at it.

My Bulbasaur was sometimes named Cretaceous. Image from http://pokemon.wikia.com/wiki/Bulbasaur

The Poison Type is a great example how things change for each passing generation.  Sometimes, a few Pokémon may become worse, but most of the time, every Pokémon becomes slightly better, slightly more usable, slightly more appealing.  New moves, new abilities, and maybe even a stat or type change makes this so.  So when the remakes come out, such as ORAS, Pokémon that you may have skipped the first time around now gravitate you towards them.  Dusty is one of them, he is amazing and I’m glad I caught him.  He’s is one more Pokémon I can add to my most favorite Pokémon Type ever.

 

No, there is no 9/11 reference in Pokemon Black/White

Pokemon Black and White introduced Pokemon’s Generation 5 to the world in 2010.  It marked a noticeable upheaval in the series as Gamefreak broke many of the series’ traditions.   One of the most obvious examples of this is a region, in this case Unova, that was not inspired by a place in Japan.  Unova had strong influences from the U.S.A. with a particular focus on NYC.  Castelia City for instance was inspired from Manhattan while Skyarrow Bridge comes from the Brooklyn Bridge.

But is the NYC inspiration more morbid than it seems?

Three years ago, Cracked.com published an article about The 9 Most Offensive 9/11 References in Pop Culture

You can see the original article here: http://www.cracked.com/article_19087_the-9-most-offensive-911-references-in-pop-culture.html#ixzz2eskwL8fK

In the number 5 spot is Pokemon Black/White where Fletcher Wortmann proclaimed that Nintendo’s game references 9/11. He does this from two different kinds of evidence.

The first one is that the barren wasteland (route 4) between Castelia and Nimbasa City represents Ground Zero from the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In the game, Route 4 contains buildings that are dilapidated. These ruins were supposedly caused by a meteor that fell from the sky and devastated the area.  The meteor represents the planes that brought down the two towers.

Kyurem, the second piece of evidence, was that respected meteor.  This 9/11 analogy is sealed up when the article points out that Kyurem is 9 feet and 11 inches tall.

kyurem

The problem with these two points of evidence is that if you actually played the game you would have found them to be simply not true.

One: Route 4 is a desert with actual desert storms and desert Pokemon. Not a site of devestation.

Two: The ruins are over 2500 years old and are dilapidated because of age, not of sudden destruction.  In fact, pokedex entries for the pokemon Sigilyph states that they are guardians for ancient cities.  Since they haunt the ruins we can therefore assume the ruins were not recently made.

Three: With the first two points in mind, there are no references in the game anywhere that a meteor “took out” this area.  However, the Giant Chasm region, where you can find Kyurem, was indeed formed by a meteor impact.  This meteor impact though is as far away as you can get from Route 4 and has no relationship to it whatsoever.  Even then, no buildings or cities were destroyed by it as it landed in a forest.

Fourth: Kyurem is 3 meteres tall which comes to about 9 feet and 10.11 inches. Not 9 feet, 11 inches.

It’s this kind of shoddy research that made me stop being a fan of Cracked.  I used to go to their site all the time but ever since this article came out, I slowly stopped visiting them.  Sure, you can be humorous for your articles even if they are sensitive topics BUT EVEN SO, you should still have your facts straight so you don’t misdirect your readers.  This is made doubly so for this article; since the author didn’t bother to double check his sources he is himself offending the 9/11 attacks by trivializing them in a Pokemon game.

The following post was adapted to a reddit post I posted last year on r/pokemon.  Original link can be seen here